Monthly Archives: May 2016

Logitech headsets and webcams for the business professional

As many of you know, I’m a full-time telecommuter. Although a portion of my work involves some travel, most days I am working from home, and a lot of that involves sitting on conference calls with colleagues and customers/partners.

Until recently, much of that required that I be desk-bound.

Anyone who has to work with VOIP and IP-based conferencing systems such as Skype, Microsoft Lync, Cisco WebEx and Citrix GoToMeeting knows that voice quality is everything if you’re going to have an effective business conversation.

And that means using devices that typically tie you to your desk, such as a wired headset or an Bluetooth/USB speakerphone, such as the Plantronics Callisto, which I have and think is an excellent product.

While there are many Bluetooth headsets and earpieces on the market which are perfectly suitable for mobile phone conversations, few are specifically optimized for use with PCs that have VOIP “Soft Phone” software, and do not deliver what I would regard as business critical voice quality.

They are perfectly fine for short calls, but not ideal when you are on a VOIP conference for as much as an hour at a time, or even longer, particularly when you need to be an active participant and when paying close attention to who is speaking and the clarity of what you are saying is essential.

As we all know about Bluetooth when it comes to audio streams, the farther you get away from the transceiver, the worse the audio gets. So it’s not practical to stray too far away from your PC.

Logitech’s latest wireless headsets have been a total game changer for my personal work situation since I’ve been using them the last few months. I’ve been using the H820e stereo version which retails for $199 but can be found for considerably less.

Installation and use of the headset is pretty straightforward — you plug the DECT 6.0 transmitter and charging base into a free USB port on your PC or Mac, and the AC power cord to power the base. The headset charges on the base when not in use, and has a built-in rechargeable battery.

The operating system recognizes it automatically, and depending on the VOIP program you are using, you may need to alter the settings to use the headset as your primary audio device.

If you’re familiar with the DECT 6.0 1.9Ghz wireless transmission standard, particularly if you have cordless phones in your house that use the technology, you know that you can get some pretty impressive range and not lose any voice quality. That’s exactly what the H820e headset gives you for VOIP calls.

My home office is a good 60 feet away from my living room and around 75 feet from my “breakfast area” which has my espresso machine and a table which faces my outdoor patio and pool area with outdoor furniture which is about 100 feet or so away from the base transmitter.

So regardless of what VOIP software I am using, and where I am in my house, I get the same crystal-clear voice quality as if I am sitting right in front of my PC. For example, this wearable computing podcast that I recorded with Rick Vanover of Veeam was actually done in my living room, while wearing the H820e using Skype.

So the quality of the audio is without dispute. What about the overall design and using it?

The H820e was designed for use for hours at a time. The stereo version is comfortable and after a while you forget you even have it on your head. While I am extremely pleased with the device, I have only a few nitpicks:

First, the “Mute” button is attached to the microphone boom and is recessed back towards where the headphone is. It doesn’t stick prominently out, so you have to sort of feel your way up the boom to finding it.

If you’re away from your PC and are not near the software controls of your VOIP client, and some sort of unplanned audio distraction occurs that you don’t want to be heard by everyone else, then it could take a few seconds to mute the audio while you fumble around with the boom. It would be better if in the next version of this product that they put it on the exterior side of the headphone holding the boom.

It’s a minor annoyance but it’s still an annoyance nonetheless.

The second is the boom mic’s sensitivity to airflow. Now, normally you don’t have a lot of “wind” in an indoor or office setting but in the summertime in Florida, I like to have a fan going in my office for better air circulation.

If that fan is pointed directly at me, it sounds like I am in an outdoor breeze. And if you are actually outdoors (like sitting on my patio and having a cup of coffee) and a little bit of wind picks up, you’re going to hear it if the mic isn’t muted, no question.

Also, if you are a heavy breather, you’ll probably want to have the boom twisted a lot farther away from your mouth than you think you need it.

Despite what I would call these two minor nitpicks I think the H820e is an excellent product and I heartily reccomend it. I’ve also spent some time with their wired headset, the H650e on business trips with my laptop and also on my Surface RT using Skype and Lync, and the audio is just as high quality as the H820e, provided your bandwidth supports the fidelity of the connection.

Not all telecommuting and conferencing is about audio, however. From time to time I do need to do video as well.

My corporate laptop, my Lenovo X1 Carbon is a great little machine but its webcam isn’t its strong suit. When it’s docked to my monitor on my desk at home, I need something that delivers much more robust and HD-quality video.

I’ve written about small busines and SOHO/workgroup video conferencing products before, like Logitech’s BCC950. While the BCC950 is an excellent product for small meeting rooms and for having three to five people on camera at once, it’s overkill for a telecommuter or just someone in a single office.

Enter the Logitech C930e, a “Business” webcam. Like any other webcam it clips to the top of your monitor and plugs into your USB 2.0 or 3.0 port. But this is no ordinary webcam.

At a street price of $129.00 it’s more expensive than Logitech’s consumer/prosumer webcam offerings, but there’s considerable enterprise-class video conferencing technology built-into this little device.

First, provided your bandwidth supports it, the C930e can capture 1080p video (or 15MP stills) at 30 frames a second because it includes Scalable Video Coding using H.264 and UVC 1.5, the second of which is needed to be certified for use with corporate-grade video conferencing tools.

Second, the camera has a 90-degree diagonal field of view so you get a widescreen capture of the subject without any “fish eye” distortion. You also get a Carl Zeiss lens and 4X digital zoom with software pan and tilt control, as well as built-in stereo microphones

Logitech also offers the consumer-oriented C920 which is about $30 cheaper than the C930e, but it lacks the the Scalable Video Coding and UVC 1.5 capabilities used with corporate applications like Lync and Cisco UC and is more suited towards Skype and other consumer video applications like Google Hangouts. It also lacks the 90-degree FOV of its more expensive sibling.

While the two cameras look very similar, they shouldn’t be confused with each other. If corporate video conferencing capability and quality is definitely what you need, you want the C930e.

Take advantage of travelers Google Google Maps

Jakarta – Indonesia invites the travelers Google using Google Maps on your phone. Rudy Ramawy, Country Head of Google Indonesia, said Google Maps on your phone makes it easy to plan the travelers a safe and comfortable journey.
“Some of it’s ease of search as the most convenient path to the destination,” said Rudy. “You can also find important information regarding the need for travel. Example, the nearest gas station or ATM.”
The travelers can also record all findings during the course of the digital device. “So, when I travel the same route, you can easily find the places you’ve visited,” Rudy explained.
When stuck in traffic, Google Maps users can find an alternative way. This online map applications presents several alternative options that can help road users avoid severe congestion at homecoming.
Google Maps to apply different color lines for different traffic conditions. For example, if there is a congested line, the red line. Yellow to crowded conditions and solid edging, while green for road conditions smoothly.
In addition, Google Maps provides information on the long journey from the user’s location to the destination or hometown. Google Maps even provide mileage information is based on the means of transportation used. For example, driving alone, walking, or using public transportation. Google Maps also provides information public transport fares.
With features and conveniences that exist, Rudy wish Google Maps users can be helped in planning trips back and forth.

Facebook speeds PHP by crafting a PHP virtual machine

Social networking giant Facebook has taken another step at making the PHP Web programming language run more quickly. The company has developed a PHP Virtual Machine that it says can execute the language as much as nine times as quickly as running PHP natively on large systems.

“Our goal is to make PHP run really, really quickly,” said Joel Pobar, a Facebook engineering manager. Facebook has been using the virtual machine, called the HipHop Virtual Machine (HHVM), across all of its servers since earlier this year.

Pobar discussed the virtual machine at the O’Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) being held this week in Portland, Oregon.

Shares its development tools

HHVM is not Facebook’s first foray into customizing PHP for faster use. PHP is aninterpreted language, meaning that the source code is executed by the processor directly. Generally speaking, programs written in interpreted languages such as PHP tend not to run as quickly as languages, such as C or C++, that have been compiled beforehand into machine language byte code. Facebook has remained loyal to PHP because it is widely understood by many of the Web programmers who work for the company.

To keep up with the insatiable user demand, however, Facebook originally devised a compiler, called HipHop, that would translate PHP code into C++, so it then it could be compiled ahead of time for faster performance.

While Facebook enjoyed considerable performance gains of this first version of HipHop for several years, it sought other ways to speed the delivery of the dynamically created Web pages to its billion or so users. “Our performance strategy for that was going to tap out,” Pobar admitted.

HHVM is the next step for Facebook. Under development for about three years, HHVM actually works on the same principle as the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). HHVM has a just-in-time (JIT) compiler that converts the human readable source code into machine-readable byte code when it is needed. (The previous HipHop, renamed HPHPc, has now been retired within Facebook.)

This JIT approach allows the virtual machine to “make smarter decisions at runtime,” Pobar said. For instance, if a call is made to the MySQL database to read a row of data, the HHVM can, on the fly, figure out what type of data it is, such as an integer or a string. It then can generate or call code on the fly that would be best suited for handling this particular type of data.

With the old HipHop, “the best it can do is analyze the entire Facebook codebase, reason about it and then specialize code based on its reasoning. But it can’t get all of the reasoning right. There are parts of the code base that you can not simply infer about or reason about,” Pobar said.

Virtual system speedier

Pobar estimated that HHVM is about twice as fast as HPHPc was, and about nine times as fast as running straight PHP.

Facebook has posted the code for HHVM on GitHub, with the hopes that others will use it to speed their PHP websites as well.

HHVM is optimized for handling very large, and heavily used, PHP codebases. Pobar reckoned that using HHVM for standard sized websites, such as one hosting a WordPress blog, would gain only about a fivefold performance improvement.

“If you take some PHP and run it in on HipHop, the CPU execution time [may] not be the limiting factor for performance. Chances are [the system is] spending too much time talking to the database or spending too time talking to [the] memcache” caching layer, Pobar said.

Data Management Android WiFi File Transfer

Cruising Through the Content Browser Using Wireless Smartphone

Transfer content from your PC to the Android-based smartphone is easy. Several methods can be used for it. You have a choice of using a regular cable connection represented USB port or wireless connection represented by bluetooth and WiFi. If you have a router that is connected to the PC and smartphone in one network, it can use wireless connections to share data without bothered by wires.

d4-436-wifiWiFi File File Transfer offers ease of operation. You pass enough alone installation on a smartphone. When run, the application will detect your internet protocol (IP) on the computer and then instantly displays the IP address of the smartphone. Later on smartphone app will display an IP address that is automatically configured. To connect the smartphone to the computer, you just enter the IP address displayed on the smartphone via the browser and automatically you can directly access the entire contents of the smartphone via browser.

Automated storage media on a smartphone will instantly appear in the browser like a file manager in Windows. You stay down all the existing content on the memory card and can perform various commands such as download, delete, copy, or rename. You can also combine all or part of existing content by performing compression in a ZIP format and make the content. The application also displays a special shortcut to a content-based image file directory with the name of the Media Gallery.

Wireless USB AC D-Link It Runs in the 2.4 GHz and 5GHz

Jakarta – To facilitate a wireless connection with your device, the D-Link introduces the Wireless Dual Band Mini USB AC Adapter DWA-171. It is shaped AC adapter Wireless mini and can operate Dual Band. The device is intended for the novice user can operate at a frequency of 2.4 GHz (up to 150Mbps) or 5GHz (up to 433Mbps). With these two options, you can freely switch device that works on both the frequency.

Seagate claims the use of these products is as easy as installing the device in your PC and press the WPS button. Then the device can be directly connected without the need for updates and additional adapter. D-Link DWA-171 uses AC frequency which is a new network of IEEE standards. This new network architecture has a higher data rate and greater reliability.

This new standard was launched to address the challenges of our time, with more and more users use mobile devices that in fact definitely use the wireless wave. Therefore, the problem of wave interference, become an increasingly important issue. Therefore, more and more wireless devices are running on the same wavelength, the greater interferensinya. This interference makes the response rate (response rate) the lower the device. In addition, a variety of applications used also requested greater bandwidth. It would require a device that can deliver greater the bandwidth.

Adapter with USB 2.0 interface is also compatible with all Wireless N products from the previous generation, you’ve had. DWA-171 Wireless USB Adapter ACDual Band Mini will be available in stores and distribution partners in the third quarter of 2013. This device also supports encryption WEP/WPA/WPA2.

Together with AMD, Toshiba Offer Notebook PC

JAKARTA – Toshiba notebook to hit the market back in the homeland. Having recently launched a dual function, this ultrabook, Toshiba re-introduced its notebook personal computer (PC) in Indonesia under the name Toshiba Satellite C40D.

Toshiba Satellite C40D which is the development of TV technology from Toshiba, claimed more powerful and rich graphics. The kitchen was redone powered by Quad-Core AMD A4 APU.

Channel Manager of Toshiba Singapore, Albert Susilo states, with the audio technologies V2 Toshiba Audio Enhancement Technology, the consumer ear audio quality spoiled by sharp and clear. “Crystal clear,” he said at the launch of the Toshiba Satellite C40D at Le Meridien Jakarta, Monday (8/7).

With a unique design and is claimed to be better than the previous generation, Toshiba Satellite C40D available with spans 14.0 HD screen. The price is pegged at under $ 5 million. “Toshiba Satellite C40D be available in the Indonesian market in early July at a price of USD 439,” said Albert Susilo.

While AMD Indonesia Country Manager, Jenny Susanto said all products from AMD’s APU is designed to provide the best computing experience. “This notebook is instantly able to deliver sharp image quality, color, and more life to improve the consumer experience in watching the video,” he said.

Jenny added, AMD has always made ​​a breakthrough to provide the latest experience that not only includes the traditional architecture, but also the latest graphics processing interface. To provide experience productivity, graphics, and entertainment, this notebook is reinforced with a variety of the latest exclusive technology from Toshiba and AMD.

NVidia Introduces World’s Fastest Graphics Card Quadro K6000

NVidia has just introduced its newest graphics card aimed at the visual computing industry and is claimed as the fastest graphics card in the world. K6000 Quadro graphics cards are built using Kepler architecture.

NVidia party also claims that this graphics card has the ability computational five times better than the Quadro 6000 graphics card before. Not only that, the graphics card is also claimed to have twice the graphical capabilities better than the Quadro 6000.

NVidia Senior VP, Ed Ellet said that this graphics card will give a significant change to the game animator, digital designer or programmer. Furthermore, Ellet said that the graphics card is capable of doing things that were previously impossible to do.

Some of the features possessed by the K6000 Quadro graphics cards are:

– The graphics memory GDDR5 ultra-fast 12GB
– Streaming 2880 core multiprocessor (SMX)
– Support for simultaneous display with a resolution up to 4k using DisplayPort 1.2
– It has ultra low latency video I / O, and support large-scale visualization

Asus Memo Pad HD 7 review: Vivid screen barely outshines slow performance

The good: The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 rocks an impressively colorful screen, features a bevy of useful customization options, and comes in at a budget price.

The bad: Its performance is mediocre and the touch screen is sometimes unresponsive. The plastic build gives it a toy-like feel and it isn’t very comfortable to hold. The dull design lacks panache.

The bottom line: For those looking to save a buck, for its low price, the Asus Memo Pad HD 7 has a bevy of useful features, though there are better performing options out there.

With the Asus Memo Pad HD 7, you really get what you pay for. The HD 7 earns its low price with a lackluster design and sluggish performance. It’s not very comfortable to hold for long periods of time, and aside from being offered in a variety of different colors, lacks a coolness other tablets try hard to aspire to.

Its performance is meekly mediocre, and consistent lagging combined with a sometimes unresponsive touch screen make the tablet best suited for simple tasks like browsing and reading.

That said, the HD 7 is a refreshing upgrade from its predecessor and its best feature is the 7-inch IPS screen that displays an impressively wide range of colors which facilitate a visually richer experience than the original Nexus 7.

If you’re on a strict budget, the Asus Memo Pad is an inexpensive and functional small tablet, but if you can spare the change, a new Nexus 7 is the better choice.

Design
Even though the tablet shares similar dimensions with the Nexus 7, it’s nowhere near as sleek or comfortable in design. The tablet fits fine in one hand, even for people with smaller hands like me, yet, despite its light weight, the design doesn’t lend itself to comfortable holding over lengthy periods of time.

The back panel protrudes slightly, and the corners slightly dig into your palms when holding it in both hands, instead of the flush, smoothly curved edges of the original Nexus 7. I often found myself wanting to put the device down after using it for awhile — not because I was done using it — but because holding it became tiresome.

The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 comes in navy blue, white, hot pink, and lime green. The navy blue version is the only one that has a back with a matte finish. The dark shade of blue attracts a minimal amount of fingerprints that are only highly visible from certain angles. The back panel is smooth and comfortable to the touch but can be a bit slippery without a tight grip.

In comparison, the reflective plastic backsides of the other colors looks less chic, but its texture helps one grip the device significantly better than the matte finish does. I personally prefer a back panel with a grippier texture, like the Nexus 7 (2012), because it enhances my comfort level in a way that extends the amount of time I can hold the device.

Since they’re both made by Asus, the Memo Pad HD 7 and the Nexus 7 (2012) share similar design elements. The power button and volume rocker on the right edge look almost identical in shape, while the rear speakers are similarly located towards the bottom edge of the tablet.

The front of the tablet is typically simple, with an Asus logo on the bottom bezel and a front-facing camera on the top. There is no ambient light sensor, therefore no automatic brightness setting.

The Memo Pad HD 7’s headphone jack, microphone pinhole, and Micro-USB port are all located on the top edge, with the microSD expansion slot — which is expandable up to 32GB — around the corner on the left edge. There are no ports on the bottom edge, but the speaker sits on the bottom of the tablet’s back, keeping the 5-megapixel rear camera on top company.

Asus Application Suite
The tablet comes loaded with the Asus Application Suite and features apps that range from useful to creative. The simple additions include a calendar, to-do list, and file manager, and it comes with 16GB of Asus WebStorage cloud service for one year.

Some of the apps that are geared towards family use include App Locker, which allows you to put passwords on specific apps; Asus Artists, where you can create “paintings” or greeting cards; and Asus Story, which helps you organize your photos into albums, or as they call them, “stories.”

The tablet comes with Power Saver, a battery saving feature that comes in handy if you’re trying to squeeze the most out of a low battery.

The custom mode lets you pick the specific functions that the power-saving option affects. For example, you can set a low screen brightness for listening to music, a higher one for watching video, and no power-saving function for reading books. When enabled, it significantly helped extend the battery life when it was low and the highly customizable options.

Floating apps
One of the most interesting and useful features on the tablet is the floating menu. On the Android navigation bar, there’s a button to the left of the back button that activates the floating menu.

When activated, a small menu pops up above the navigation bar that contains a selection of floating apps that you can quickly access without having to close whatever app you’re currently using. Since the apps “float” on the screen, on top of whatever is already open, it’s almost like a multiwindow option, but they can only perform simple tasks and can’t compare to the multiwindow functions that the Microsoft Surface or some of the Samsung Galaxy tablets provide.

Floating apps are an easy way to multitask, and I liked the ability to use the browser while watching video, but not all streaming video services continue to play while a floating app is open. With the exception of a few floating apps, including the calculator and compass, Netflix did not let me use most of the floating apps while simultaneously watching video, although YouTube did.

Despite providing an easy way to multitask, the floating apps don’t have the same functionality as the fullscreen app and are limited in their capabilities; the YouTube app only shows recommended videos — you can’t search — and the Twitter app displays only one tweet at a time. There is a limited amount of floating apps, and although the floating menu is customizable, not all downloaded apps have the ability to be floating ones.

Speaker features
The Memo Pad HD 7 houses stereo speakers with Asus SonicMaster audio technology and Audio Wizard software. Although the speakers aren’t great, the number of specific audio settings are. The tablet allows you to manually adjust separate volume settings for app audio, notifications, and alarms.

Sony Xperia Sailing Release 6.4 Inches in Indonesia

Located in Jakarta, Wednesday (24/7), Sony introduced the Xperia Z Ultra which has a 6.4-inch screen with Full HD TRILUMINOS X-Reality Engine.

This display capability is claimed to provide a better experience, especially with the screen size is much larger than the original version of the Xperia Z.

Very powerful embedded processors, the Qualcomm Snapdragon 2.2GHz quad-core 800. Xperia Z Ultra is also supported by 2GB of RAM and 16GB of internal memory plus a microSD slot.

Interestingly, despite carrying a variety of hardware on board, it is able to present the Sony Xperia Z Ultra designs become thinner. In fact, the thickness is only 6.5 mm into the MURI.

As in the previous Z series Xperia, Xperia Z Ultra smartphone is also quite tough waterproof and dust to IP55 and IP58 certification.

Unfortunately, some of the above advantages make Sony should cut the camera was 13 megapixels to 8 megapixels alone. However, Sony claims the camera is equipped with Exmor RS Mobileserta HDR is able to produce extremely sharp images.

Sony did not forget to announce the presence of Sony Music JIVE application in Xperia Z Ultra. Through these apps, users can download and streaming his favorite songs for free for 6 months. Not only that, there are also apps Path and e-reader Wayang Force which has been available since the beginning of the purchase Xperia Z Ultra.

“Xperia Z Ultra available in early August with two colors, namely Black and White,” said Ika Paramita, Marketing Manager of Sony Mobile Communications Indonesia. About the price, that puts smartphones via NFC Connectivity One Touch is priced at 7.5 million dollars worth.

Cisco’s acquisition of Sourcefire Rp 27 Trillion

California – The company manufactures and network equipment Cisco Systems Inc. will buy security firm Sourcefire. Companies based in San Jose, California that want to expand their business network security sector.
According to the Head of Business Development Cisco, Hilton Romanski, the company wanted to find a target security firm to grow its business. “We look at the major players security business, Sourcefire apparently the most fitting,” she said on Tuesday (23/7) local time.
With this purchase, the shares of each Sourcefire will be priced at U.S. $ 76. Sourcefire’s stock price jumped 28 percent from Monday’s closing price, U.S. $ 59.08.
Cisco is now focused on the security sector. They will mengenjot safety factor in the hardware, software and cloud. Sourcefire is strong in the security sector, especially the matter of detecting and protecting against any attacks.
According to analysts, this penjuala is expensive but worth it. Because in the security market, the market pie Cisco rivals such as Juniper Networks seized Inc., Check Point Software Technologies, and Palo Alto Networks Inc.. But Cisco reluctant to let market. Cisco Security Head Chris Young said the company will not stop until I can be a pioneer in the field of security.
With this acquisition, research firm IDC rate, Cisco should reach growth of as much as 7.8 percent. Brian White, analyst at Topeka Capital Markets judge, with this acquisition, the kinds of large competitors Dell and Hewlett Packard will also provide bid security for their clients.